The Secret Trash Collection in a New York Sanitation Garage

Garbage Museum1, NYC, AtlasObscura_comOn the second floor of a nondescript warehouse owned by New York City’s Sanitation Department in East Harlem is a treasure trove—filled with other people’s trash.

Most of the building is used as a depot for garbage trucks, but there’s a secret collection that takes over an entire floor. The space is populated by a mind-bogglingly wide array of items: a bestiary of Tamagotchis, Furbies; dozens of Pez dispensers; female weight lifting trophies; 8-track tapes; plates, paintings, sporting equipment and much more.

This is the Treasures in the Trash collection, created entirely out of objects found by Nelson Molina, a now-retired sanitation worker, who began by decorating his locker. Collected over 30 years, it is a visual explosion, organized by type, color, and size. Recently, Atlas Obscura had the chance to visit the collection with the New York Adventure Club, take some photos, and revel in the vast creative possibilities of trash.

Unfortunately, this isn’t a collection that keeps regular hours; drop-ins are not allowed. For more information on the occasional organized tours, email tours@dsny.nyc.gov.
Garbage Museum2, NYC, AtlasObscura_com

Guitars, including an original Fender, surround the Michael Jackson shrine … see more pics, read more —>  http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/fascinating-photos-from-the-secret-trash-collection-in-a-new-york-sanitation-garage/?utm_medium=am

200-Year-Old Crypts Buried Just a Few Feet Below Greenwich Village

Workers digging near New York’s iconic Washington Square Park have uncovered two burial chambers. The crypts house coffins and human bones thought to be about 200 years old.

So far the team has identified more than a dozen coffins in the vaults, which could have been part of the burial grounds of one of two now-defunct Presbyterian churches, according to archaeologist Alyssa Loorya, owner of Chrysalis, the company tasked with investigating the site.

Loorya soon hopes to be able to make out nameplates positioned atop the coffins. One of the crypts, which she says had clearly been disturbed by human hands, includes a pile of skulls and other bones that seem to have been stacked in the corner after the bodies disintegrated.

“We knew that we could be encountering some human remains,” says associate commissioner Tom Foley of New York’s Department of Design and Construction. That’s part of why the group has been working with archaeologists since beginning its $9-million project to install a water main running from the east to west sides of town. “As you peel away the asphalt and concrete face of this city, you find its history.”

From 1797 through 1825, the location served as a “potter’s field,” a public burial ground. Experts estimate that tens of thousands of decomposed bodies lay beneath the stones that line the park and its pathways. After the land became a city park in 1827, a military parade that featured cannons reportedly overturned stones and revealed yellow shrouds covering the remains of people who died during yellow fever outbreaks.

Foley has firsthand experience unearthing Manhattan’s historical mysteries. Previous construction projects came upon artifacts including … read more —> http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/

World Famous FREE Museums Around The Globe! (MOMA, NYC)

Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

Split levels in the Museum of Modern Art - NYC. Admission is free for all visitors during UNIQLO Free Friday Nights, held every Friday evening from 4:00 to 8:00 p.m.

courtesy of:  http://www.pinterest.com/ottsworld/free-museums-around-the-globe/

America’s Castles – Lyndhurst

Lyndhurst sits along the Hudson River in Tarrytown, NY. (Image: Urban/Wikipedia)

Lyndhurst sits beside the Hudson River in Tarrytown, N.Y. Originally built in 1938, Lyndhurst was home to people who shaped generations, from New York City Mayor William Paulding to railroad tycoon Jay Gould. When the home was built, surrounding swamps were drained to create the rolling landscape that still surrounds the home today. The castle is now a National Historic Landmark, and according to its website, the grounds still display “sweeping lawns accented with shrubs and specimen trees, the curving entrance drive revealing ‘surprise’ views, the angular repetition of the Gothic roofline in the evergreens, and the nation’s first steel-framed conservatory.”

courtesy of:  http://www.weather.com/

America’s Castles – Hempstead House

Hempstead House in Sands Point, NY is also called the Gould-Guggenheim Estate or Castle Gould. (Image: Michael Gray/Flickr)

The Hempstead House in New York’s Sands Point Preserve was full of pure extravagance in the early 1900s. Rare orchids filled a sunken palm court; exotic birds and wild flowers filled an aviary; the library was built to resemble the library of King James I. You can still visit the grounds of the Sands Point Preserve, which include half-a-dozen trails through woods, fields, a beach and a pond near the Long Island sound.

courtesy of:  http://www.weather.com/